The Phantom of the Opera, Doctor Who, Titanic, Fringe, DS9, Game of Thrones, Sherlock Holmes, Gary Oldman, Jared Harris, Geoffrey Whitehead - that's all mine! You can't have none!

lilygarlands:

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA CHALLENGE | 10 performers

› [5/10] Earl Carpenter

Never lose your temper in the middle of a door sign.

oldschoolphantoms:

Alexander Goebel and Luzia Nistler. Vienna, Austria. Ca. 1993.

whatwouldwaltdo:

elf-in-mirror:

It seems I’ve made a thing. Wait how did this happen I was going to draw.

—-

all images © Disney and Don Bluth

This is the greatest thing ever.

operafantomet:

The original Hamburg proscenium (top) and the current one (bottom). 

The original one was larger, and made the stage incredibly wide. The current one isn’t small by any means, it’s still a very wide and spacy stage, but it’s more concentrated. Is it heresy to say I like the current one more? 

Current one is from Madrid but the original (Hamburg) angel is lurking around backstage.

Anonymous:
Do you have any photos of The Phantom singing his final note, but instead of the picture being vertical it's horizontal? Hopefully that made sense.

operafantomet:

Well, if not the very last note, here’s at least some from the last half of the Final Lair scene: 

Thomas Schulze, Hamburg: 
image


Hugh Panaro, Broadway: 
image

Alexander Goebel, Vienna: 
image


Flemming Enevold, Copenhagen: 
image

operafantomet:

Phantom dummy heads backstage: 

1. Anthony Crivello’s Las Vegas deformity in sculpting. This is the best example of how similar the Vegas deformity looked unpainted. 
2. Peter Karrie’s deformity and slick wig, Toronto. 
3. Michael Crawford’s original headcast and deformity, West End. 
4. Anthony Warlow’s fedora, ready for a healthy meal Aussie/World Tour. 
5. Michael Lackey’s headcast and fedora in Las Vegas. 
6. Anthony Crivello’s slick wig in Las Vegas. 
7. Flemming Enevold’s mask and alopecia wig, Copenhagen. 
8. Flemming Enevold’s slick wig, Copenhagen. 

Anonymous:
I just wonder: how would one construct that plain white Phantom/Charles-Dance-Mask? I really adore this mask but I got noooo idea how to do such a thing (I'm awful at sewing and even worse at anything else). But Halloween's getting closer... So, I would totally appreciate any tips, tricks and information!!!! Love your stuff! I really do, you are such a freaking inspiration, even to people untalented as me! Thank you from the bottom of my heart!

phantomonabudget:

Hi, thank you so much for the ask! :)  I’m assuming you’re talking about the below mask (since he has several in that film)?

image

If you want to keep costs low, the easiest thing is to go to a nearby Halloween store (like a Party City, Hobby Lobby, or Halloween specific shop) and picking up a cheap, generic white full face mask.  These usually run about $3-5.  Cut out around the mouth, and trim around the top corners to round those off a little bit.  Those masks are usually made of thin plastic, so they are easy to trim with scissors or an exacto knife.  Just mark where you want to cut with a pencil before you start cutting.

Since that mask has a tan-ish tint to it, if you want to be super accurate you can throw some acrylic paint on it to give it that look, or leave it plain white.  His mask is also kept on with what appears to be either elastic or string, and those party masks already come with elastic…so not only is it convenient and cheap, in this instance it’s somewhat accurate.  Put some dark eyeshadow all around your eyes and you’ll be all set!

For homemade options, probably the most low-budget yet creative option I’ve seen is this clever method using tin foil, newspaper, paper towel, and flour paste!  A slightly less complicated, but slightly more expensive version of the same thing is this example using plaster wrap to build the mask on your face.  This guarantees a great fit to your features.  For attachments, either drill a small hole on each side of the mask in front of the ear and attach with elastic or string, or hot glue some craft wire to the inside of the mask (which would not require holes in the mask itself).

I hope that was helpful, if you have any additional questions let me know. Thank you so much once again for the ask and the lovely compliments!  They really blew me away, it makes me feel so great to help people out with their costuming goals.  It’s incredibly humbling for me to read those words.  You ARE talented, everyone has it in them to do this stuff, sometimes we just have to get a starting point.  Have fun!  :)

SH